4: To Love the Lord Your God – Sabbath School Teaching Plan

4: To Love the Lord Your God – Teaching Plan

Posted on  by Michael Frackeravatar

Key Thought: In the heart of the Hebrew Schema is the statement, “And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, and strength.
October 23, 2021

1. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 10:12Ephesians 2:1-10..

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. How are we supposed to love and fear God at the same time? How does this make sense?
  3. Personal Application: For what reason should we be telling people to “fear God” today in preparation for His coming? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “If God is love, no one should fear Him. There is no reason to be afraid of God anymore than if we believed that He doesn’t exist.” How would you respond to your friend?

2. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 4:377:7,8,1310:15..

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2.  ?
  3. Personal Application: What reasons do we have for wanting to love God in our hearts and minds? Share your thoughts
  4. Case Study: One of your friends states, “Many religions teach about a god orgods that have human characteristics of love, hate, jealousy, and indifference. How is God any different than those perpetuated by other religions?” How would you respond to your friend?

3. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 5:107:910:12,13..

  1. a. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. ?
  3. Personal Application: Should we obey God to avoid punishment? What if we don’t want to obey God? What are your motives for obedience? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “Oh, I love God, and I love my family. I tell them that all the time. But I don’t want the church or my family infringing on my time or trying to tell me what to do. I want to live my life to please me, and not to serve or wait on others.“ How would you respond to your relative?

4. Have a volunteer read Mark 12:28-30..

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. Why is obedience and love so intricately tied together? Does obedience bring love, or does love bring obedience?
  3. Personal Application: How can you love God when you have never seen Him personally? How can you love the invisible, the untouchable, the intangible? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.”Ministry of Healing, p. 148).

Love is why we Have to

Photo by Katya Wolf on Pexels.com

Love does no wrong to others, so love fulfills the requirements of God’s law. Romans 13:10 NLT 

A young grade school boy and his daddy were walking down a country road, when they noticed a car pull over to the shoulder a few hundred meters up the road. The passenger door opened, and a little puppy fell out the door into the ditch near the shoulder of the road. The boy watched in amazement as the car then sped off. The boy ran to the aid of the little puppy. He found the puppy whining and confused as well as looking malnourished. When the father finally caught up to the boy, the boy firmly told his daddy, “I know you may not let me keep him, but we have to take him home and feed him right now!” 

What did the little boy mean by “we have to?” How did an abandoned puppy suddenly became his problem? Was there some law written in stone that the boy had to rescue this poor dog? As a matter fact there was a law, but it was not written in stone. The only reason why the boy said, “we have to” is because there was a law written on that little boy’s heart. 

In Luke 10:30-37 Jesus tells a familiar story we call today, “The Good Samaritan.” In the story both the Levi and the priest knew the law of God which was written in stone, but yet they passed by a suffering brother, because that law was not written on their hearts. Then a Samaritan walks by who has the law of love written on his heart. He at once recognized what he had to do, not because of the law written in stone but because it was a law of love tugging at his heart strings. Like puppet strings, his heart strings controlled his behavior. Love and compassion were written on his heart and controlled his behavior. 

Writing God’s law of love on our heart is not new to the New Testament. the goal was never to have the law of love written on stone. The ultimate goal was always to have the law written on our hearts. This goes back to the Old Testament. 

But this is the new covenant I will make with the people of Israel after those days,” says the Lord. “I will put my instructions deep within them, and I will write them on their hearts. I will be their God, and they will be my people. Jeremiah 31:33 NLT 

And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength. Deuteronomy 6:5 NLT 

“Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against a fellow Israelite, but love your neighbor as yourself. I am the Lord. Leviticus 19:18 NLT

True justice must be given to foreigners living among you and to orphans, and you must never accept a widow’s garment as security for her debt. Deuteronomy 24:17 NLT

In the Old Testament as well as today, God does not just want the letter of the law written on stone. He wants the spirit of the law written on our hearts. That means showing love and compassion for a little puppy that will never be able to help you. It means showing love and compassion for a neighbor or foreigner who would probably just spit on you and pass you by if the situation was reversed.  

This “letter” is written not with pen and ink, but with the Spirit of the living God. It is carved not on tablets of stone, but on human hearts. 2 Corinthians 3:3 NLT 

A Samaritan had to rescue a foreigner left to die in a ditch, a young boy had to rescue a helpless puppy, not because of a law carved in stone. They had to because the law was etched upon their hearts. 

You may study this week’s Sabbath School lesson here.

3: The Everlasting Covenant-Sabbath School Teaching Plan

3: The Everlasting Covenant – Teaching Plan

Posted on  by Michael Frackeravatar

Key Thought: All through the Bible the covenant and the gospel appear together. The central truth of the covenant was the gospel: salvation by faith.
October 16, 2021

1. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 9:527.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. What do these verses tell us about the covenant promises made?
  3. Personal Application: Since we are saved by grace through faith, what role does the law play in our lives today? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “Does God overlook and excuse our sins because we have accepted Him as our Savior and become His children? Did He excuse and overlook Israel’s sins in the desert?” How would you respond to your friend?

2. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 5:1-7.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. What shows how central the idea of the covenant is to the book of Deuteronomy?
  3. Personal Application: Do we look at this covenant as pertaining to us as Israel today? How different is this covenant from the new covenant in Hebrews 8:10 and 10:16? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “Why did Moses say that the covenant was not with their fathers, but with them, and they are here today? How do I make sense out of this verse?“ How would you respond to your relative?

3. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 26:16-19.

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. How is the covenant relationship between God and Israel summed up?
  3. Personal Application: Share your thoughts
  4. Case Study: One of your friends states, “What does it mean that God wanted Israel to be a holy people? Can anyone ever really be holy? Keeping God’s commandments even from a heart of love is impossible for sinful beings. So what is God’s expectation for holiness?” How would you respond to your friend?

4. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 8:514:132:6.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. What kind of imagery here reflects the kind of relationship God wants for His people?
  3. Personal Application: How do you look at God? What kind of relationship do you have with Him??” Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.”Ministry of Healing, p. 148).

2: Moses’ History Lesson-Sabbath School Teaching Plan

2: Moses’ History Lesson – Teaching Plan

Posted on  by Michael Frackeravatar

Key Thought: Just as Israel was to enter the promised land, Moses gave them a history lesson, remember what the Lord has done for you in the past. This should also mean something to us as we prepare to enter the promised land.
October 9, 2021

1. Have a volunteer read Exodus 32:29-32.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. What does this show about the character of Moses and why God was able to use him?
  3. Personal Application: Most people want to be leaders in concern for themselves, while God picked a leader who was concerned for others above himself. Do you see this kind of leadership in your church? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “Why would Moses risk his own eternal life for the Israelites who had rebelled against him, accused him, didn’t listen to him, and constantly complained about his leadership?” How would you respond to your friend?

2. Have a volunteer read Deuteronomy 1:9-11.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. What is significant about the fact that this is mentioned as the fortieth year?
  3. Personal Application: Why would Moses want Israel to multiply so much when he just said that they were too much for him to handle? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “How can you be so sure of the prophecies you mention that are supposed to happen in the future?.“ How would you respond to your relative?

3. Have a volunteer read Numbers 14:11-20.

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. What reasoning did Moses use in interceding for the people with God?
  3. Personal Application: How are we to bring about the manifold wisdom of God to the world? Share your thoughts
  4. Case Study: One of your friends states, “Why did God put up with the Israelites in the wilderness? Why didn’t He just destroy them all and start over like He did at the flood?” How would you respond to your friend?

4. Have a volunteer read Genesis 15:1-16.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. How do we understand God’ purpose in destroying whole cities including men, women, and children in Israel’s march across the area?
  3. Personal Application: How do you respond to someone who says that God is love and He doesn’t destroy anyone?” Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.”Ministry of Healing, p. 148).