9: Jacob the Supplanter-Sabbath School Lesson Teaching Plan

Prepared by William Earnhardt, For Sabbath School Class, Sabbath, May 28, 2022.

Main Theme: Jacob deceives and then gets deceived, thus learning what goes around comes around.

Read Together: Genesis 25: 21-34. Discuss the main theme of this passage.

Study: What qualities of Jacob predispositioned him to be more worthy than Esau of Isaac’s blessings?

Apply: Jacob wanted something good, something of value, and that was admirable (especially compared to his brother’s attitude). Yet, he used deception and lies to get it. How can we avoid falling into a similar trap of doing bad so that “good” may come?

Share: Your friend says its okay to tell a white lie in order to avoid hurting someone’s feelings. Do you agree with your friend? Why or why not?

Read Together: Genesis 29:20-30. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: How and why does God allow for Laban’s deception? What lessons did Jacob learn?

Apply: How can we avoid justifying doing something bad so that good may come? 

Share: Your friend asks if God let Jacob get deceived so that he would then realize and be convicted of his own lies. What do you tell your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 30:15-22. Summarize this passage.

Study: How are we to understand the meaning of what takes place here?

Apply: How does this story reveal that God’s purpose will be fulfilled despite human errors?

Share: Your friend asks why God was so good to Leah when Leah was deceptive? What do you share with your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 30:25-32. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: What is going on here, and what kind of reasoning does Jacob use? What is Laban’s response?

Apply: Have you ever been cheated by an employer? How did you deal with it?

Share: Think of someone who would be encouraged by this week’s message. How can you share it with them this week?

God’s Promises to Abraham are God’s Promises to you

I will confirm my covenant with you and your descendants after you, from generation to generation. This is the everlasting covenant: I will always be your God and the God of your descendants after you. Genesis 17:7 NLT

When God made His covenant with Abraham He was making it with all of us. All of the promises that were given to Abraham were given to us.

A member of a church in which I had recently spoken asked me to come to her home. She was very upset because a neighbor claimed to be a witch and put a curse on her home and family. The lady church member believed in God but was afraid of what this curse might mean. When I got to her home I shared this passage with her. It is a promise God made to Abraham.

The Lord had said to Abram, “Leave your native country, your relatives, and your father’s family, and go to the land that I will show you. I will make you into a great nation. I will bless you and make you famous, and you will be a blessing to others. I will bless those who bless you and curse those who treat you with contempt. All the families on earth will be blessed through you.” Genesis 2:1-3 NLT

The Lord promised to bless those who blessed Abraham and to treat those who cursed him with contempt. I actually think the KJV is a little more powerful on this point when it says, “I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee.” Right after this promise was given, Abraham went into Egypt, and instead of trusting God to care for him, he trusted a lie he invented that Sara was only his sister, not his wife. Not only are lies deceitful, they show we are not trusting God. When we trust God we have no reason to make up lies. Pharaoh took Sara to himself, not knowing she was married. Even though Abraham was less than perfect in this situation the Lord still kept his promise like He always does.

But the Lord sent terrible plagues upon Pharaoh and his household because of Sarai, Abram’s wife. Genesis 12:17 NLT

Even when Abraham was less than perfect and even had trust issues, the Lord kept his promise to curse those who cursed him. I reminded the lady I was visiting, that Balaam tried to curse Israel but could only bless them! See Numbers 23:11-12. The Lord’s blessing continued for the great nation of Israel the Lord had promised to Abraham. The lady I was visiting thought that was all wonderful for Abraham but what did that have to do with her and the curse that was placed upon her? I asked her if she belonged to Christ and of course she said she did. I told her I had good news for her.

And now that you belong to Christ, you are the true children of Abraham. You are his heirs, and God’s promise to Abraham belongs to you. Galatians 3:29 NLT

I shared with her that the promise to bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you belonged to her just as much it did to Abraham. She claimed this promise and when I spoke to her again many months later, the neighbor was gone and there were no signs of any curses.

Once there was an elder in my area who was being slandered by some of the other church leaders. Thank God the church body could see through the other leaders’ lies and stood up for him. When the truth came out and the elder was exonerated ,one of his enemies, who was also a leader was too proud to recant his lies and accusations. Not long after, the leader who made the false accusations retired to a new area. Soon he had to move far away from the area he retired in, because of accusations that were made against him which were much more serious than the one he made against the local elder. Some called it karma, some called it what goes around comes around. I can’t help but think of God’s promise, “I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you.” I hope too that this situation led the slandering leader to repentance and salvation.

Now before we start acting all high and mighty when God works in our favor, it’s important to remember that God blessed Abraham because of His own faithfulness, not the faithfulness of Abraham. Even though God cursed Pharaoh so to speak, Abraham still had his own lesson to learn about honesty and trusting God instead of lies. I would imagine even when God curses those who curse us that we too still need to humbly learn some lessons as well. The promise in Genesis 12:3 goes on to say that all families of the earth will be blessed as God wants to bless and save all of us friends and foes, just as he saved faulty Abraham.

You may study this week’s Sabbath School lesson here.

7: The Covenant With Abraham-Sabbath School Lesson Teaching Plan

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Prepared by William Earnhardt, for Sabbath School class, Sabbath May 14, 2022.

Main Theme: The promises given to Abraham are for all believers. “And now that you belong to Christ, you are the true children of Abraham. You are his heirs, and God’s promise to Abraham belongs to you.” Galatians 3:29 NLT

Read Together: Genesis 15:1-6. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: How did Abraham reveal what it means to live by faith?

Apply: What does it mean if we start counting up or relying on our good works?

Share: Your friend says that if we are counted righteous because we believe then there is no reason to obey. How do you respond to your friend? See Genesis 26:5 and James 2:23-24.

Read Together: Genesis 17:1-12. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: What is the spiritual and prophetic significance of the circumcision rite?

Apply: How do you keep believing even when we struggle with belief?

Share: Your friend says that circumcision is nothing more than barbaric sexual mutilation. How do you respond to your friend? See Why Circumcision.

Read Together: Genesis 18:1-8 and Romans 9:9. Define the main idea of these passages.

Study: What lessons of hospitality do we learn from Abraham’s reception of his visitors? How do you explain God’s response to Abraham’s hospitality?

Apply: What is our responsibility to the poor and hungry? How do we help those in need? What stipulations would you put on helping someone who is in need?

Share: Your friend asks, what it was that made Abraham so generous? What do you tell your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 18:22-Genesis 19:13. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: How does Abraham’s prophetic ministry affect his responsibility toward Lot?

Apply: How do you respond to someone who says that God does not punish the lost, that it is against His love?

Share: How can we help the sinner realize their need of a Savior without making them feel like the scum of the earth?

For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved. John 3:17 NKJV

6: The Roots of Abraham-Sabbath School Lesson Teaching Plan

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Prepared by William Earnhardt for Sabbath School class, Sabbath, May 7, 2022.

Main Theme: God has a plan for His loved ones.

Read Together: Genesis 12:1-9. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: Why did God call Abram to leave his country and family? How did Abram respond?

Apply: What might God be calling you to leave behind? That is, what part of your life might you have to abandon in order to heed the call of God?

Share: Your friend is given an opportunity to serve a couple of years in the mission field far from home. A decent salary and travel and lodging are all provided. Your friend acknowledges that it looks like God is leading in this venture, but your friend does not want to leave a comfortable home, as well as family and friends. What can you share with your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 12:10-20. Discuss the key idea in this passage.

Study: Why did Abram leave the Promised Land to go to Egypt? How did the pharaoh behave in comparison to Abram?

Apply: What should this story teach us about how easy it is, even for faithful Christians, to stray from the correct path? Why is disobedience never a good choice?

Share: Your friend acknowledges that we are saved by faith, but says that a lack of obedience shows a lack of faith. Do you agree with your friend? Why or why not?

Read Together: Genesis 13:1-18. Discuss the main idea of this passage.

Study: What does this story teach us about the importance of character?

Apply: How can we learn to be kind and generous to others, even when they aren’t that way to us?

Share: Your friend asks, “How can we reach wicked cities with the Gospel if we are counselled to live in the country and stay away from such places?” What do you tell your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 14:1-17. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: What is significant about this war taking place just after the gift of the Promised Land? What does this story teach us about Abram?

Apply: What kind of influence do our actions have on others? What kind of message are we sending about our faith by our actions?

Share: Can you think of a friend who needs to be encouraged by the fact that God has a plan for their life? Can you reach out and encourage your friend this week?

“By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to the place which he would receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going” Hebrews 11:8 NKJV

5: All Nations and Babel – Sabbath School Teaching Plan

5: All Nations and Babel – Teaching Plan

Posted on  by Michael Frackeravatar

Key Thought: The curse of Ham and the curse of the confused nations at the tower of Babel will eventually be turned into a blessing for the nations.
April 30, 2022

1. Have a volunteer read Genesis 9:18-27.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. What message do you see in this story for us today?
  3. Personal Application: What does Noah getting drunk tell us about how flawed humans really are and why we need God’s grace at all times in our lives? Share your thoughts..
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “Why is there so much emphasis on genealogy in the Bible? Is there a reason for this?” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read Genesis 11:1-4.

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. Why were the people of earth so keen to achieve unity?
  3. Personal Application: Do you see more unity among people outside the church or inside the church? Does unity involve compromise? Share your thoughts
  4. Case Study: One of your friends states, “Why do people always try to twist the words of God to fit their ideas and lifestyle? When people are faced with pure truth and facts from the Bible, they say that it doesn’t apply to us today or its not relevant. Instead of adjusting to the Bible, they try to fit the Bible to them, or they ignore it altogether.” How would you respond to your friend?

3. Have a volunteer read Genesis 1:5-7 ; Psalm 139:7-12..

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. Why did God come down to the earth here? What event motivated His reaction?
  3. Personal Application: In what ways do people make a towel of Babel today in trying to bring honor and glory to themselves? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “I wonder if God is concerned with our scientists cloning life in the laboratory, seeking to make life and alter genetic material, trying to manipulate the weather, and promoting ideas of life as evolutionary rather than created? Where does He draw the line to “come down” and do something about it?” How would you respond to your relative?

4. Have a volunteer read Genesis 11:8,9 ; 9:1..

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. How is God’s act of dispersing the people a redemptive one?
  3. Personal Application: Why must we be careful in making a name for ourselves? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.”Ministry of Healing, p. 148).

4: The Flood-Sabbath School Lesson Teaching Plan

Prepared by William Earnhardt for Sabbath School class, April 23, 2022.

Main Theme: While God has to destroy sin He wants to save the sinner.

Read Together: Genesis 6:13-7:10. Discuss the main idea of this passage.

Study: What lesson can we learn from this amazing account of early human history?

Apply: Read 2 peter 2:5-9. Why was only Noah’s family saved? What lesson can we learn from the Noah story regarding our role in warning the world about coming judgment?

Share: Your friend mentions that today it seems like God does not punish sin. Evil people get away with everything, never facing judgment. How do you answer your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 7:1-24. Discuss the main idea of this passage.

Study: Why does the description of the Flood remind us of the Creation account? What lessons can we learn from the parallels between the two events?

Apply: What in us needs to be destroyed in order to be created anew? See Romans 6:1-6.

Share: While studying prophecy a friend asks, “Why does a year equal 360 days instead of 365 days?” How do you answer your friend? See Genesis 7:11 and Genesis 8:3-4.

Read Together: Genesis 8:1. Discuss the main idea of this passage.

Study: What does it mean that God “remembered” Noah?

Apply: Read Genesis 8:1, Genesis 19:29 and Psalm 106:4. What does the expression “God remembers” mean? What does this truth mean for us, now — that is, how has God shown you that He “remembers” you?

Share: A friend asks, “If God remembers everything how does He forget out sins?” How do you answer your friend?

Read Together: Genesis 9:8-17. Discuss the main idea of this passage.

Study: What is the significance of the rainbow? How does this “sign of the covenant” (Genesis 9:13) relate to the other sign of the covenant, the Sabbath?

Apply: Next time you see a rainbow, think about all of God’s promises to us. Why can we trust those promises, and how does the rainbow show us that we can trust them?

Share: Do you have a friend who needs to hear the plan of God’s salvation? Can you share it with them this week?

“God hates the sin but loves the sinner” -Ellen G. White.

The New Covenant Promises New Hearts That Will Keep an Everlasting Law

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While the two covenants can be confusing for some of us, I really appreciate a couple of things last week’s Sabbath School lesson brought out, which I believe clears up any confusion. 

While many people believe that God changed His covenant at the cross, speaking of the covenant in the Old Testament, God told us through David,

My covenant I will not break, Nor alter the word that has gone out of My lips. Psalms 89:34 NKJV

Here God is saying He is not going to change His covenant. So did God change His covenant at the cross? Well let’s look at God’s covenant in the Old Testament. Of course a covenant is a promise. So what were God’s promises?

In Genesis 3:15 God promises a Savior.

And I will put enmity Between you and the woman, And between your seed and her Seed; He shall bruise your head, And you shall bruise His heel. Genesis 3:15 NKJV

Did God change this promise at the cross? Of course not. He fulfilled this promise at the cross.

In Genesis 12:1-3 God promises Abram a Savior, among many things. 

Now the Lord had said to Abram: “Get out of your country, From your family And from your father’s house, To a land that I will show you. I will make you a great nation; I will bless you And make your name great; And you shall be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, And I will curse him who curses you; And in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.” Genesis 12:1-3 NKJV

Were any of these promises done away with at the cross? Not at all. As a matter of fact we read in Galatians,

And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise. Galatians 3:29 NKJV.

The NLT makes it even more clear at to exactly what this means. 

And now that you belong to Christ, you are the true children of Abraham. You are his heirs, and God’s promise to Abraham belongs to you. Galatians 3;29 NLT 

Instead of God’s covenant to Abraham being changed, it was extended to everyone who believes. 

At Sinai God makes a promise,

You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to Myself. Now therefore, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be a special treasure to Me above all people; for all the earth is Mine. And you shall be to Me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.’ These are the words which you shall speak to the children of Israel.” Exodus 19:4-6 NKJV

In the original manuscripts the word “obey” is “Shama.” It means to listen. The word “keep” is “shamar.” it means to regard, care for or treasure. God says.”Keep my covenant,” and we know that God’s covenant is a promise. How are supposed to keep God’s promise? We aren’t. God is telling us to listen to His voice and treasure His promise! The word “shamar” is also used in Genesis when Adam was told to shamar the garden, or keep the garden. Was Adam told to obey the garden? No, of course not. He was told to regard, treasure and care for the garden. In this passage God is telling His people to treasure His covenant promises, and by thus doing, they will be His special people,  made holy, preserved from corruption, a kingdom of priests. Was this promise changed after the cross?

by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. 2 Peter 1:4 NKJV

But you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light; 1 Peter 2:9 NKJV

Once again we see that God’s covenant does not change from Old Testament to New Testament. Everything promised in the Old Testament becomes reality in the New Testament – as  long as we trust in His great and precious promises. That’s because God’s covenant given to Adam, Abram and Moses is an eternal covenant as expressed in Psalm 89:34. This is why Monday’s lesson of last week brought out that the “New” Covenant was actually a renewing of the everlasting covenant God originally gave to Adam, Abram and Moses. When God spoke of a “new” covenant in Jeremiah 31, He used the word, “hadashah,” which means to renew. Abram forsook God’s everlasting covenant when he took Hagar as his wife. He stopped trusting God’s promises and covenant and tried working things out on his own. At Sinai instead of trusting God’s promises, Israel started making their own promises, saying, “All that God said we will do.” (See Exodus 19:8) This original Covenant was never the problem. God’s Covenant was never intended to be about legalism. The original Covenant God made  was all about grace. Hebrews 8:8 says the problem was with the people. They started making their own promises instead of trusting God’s great and precious promises. When people kept trying to make their own promises and work things out on their own, God had to renew the original covenant all the way back in Genesis 3:15, which is based on better promises – God’s promises, rather than people’s promises. For more see Better Promises Make a Better Covenant. When Paul speaks of the old covenant I believe he means “old” as in “useless.” because our promises are useless. Paul is not referring to the original everlasting covenant as the old covenant. He is referring to the legalistic covenant that man made at Sinai as the old covenant as in useless. Man made covenants are useless in both Old and New Testaments.

The “New” Covenant of grace is actually the everlasting covenant of grace found all the way through both the Old and New Testaments, beginning in Genesis 3:15. God never changed this covenant. But He renewed this covenant whenever people tried to change covenants by making their own promises. The “New” Covenant is the original everlasting covenant, which  is God making promises to man. The “old” Covenant, which is a useless covenant, is a covenant man made after God made the everlasting Covenant.  When Abram took Hagar, he was making his own legalistic covenant apart from God’s everlasting covenant. The same for the Jews when they promised at Sinai that they themselves would do what God had promised. 

Some have the idea that the law is the Old Covenant ,while grace is the New Covenant. However when Paul said, “Therefore by the deeds of the law no flesh will be justified in His sight” in Romans 3:20, Paul was not saying anything new. Paul was stating a truth as everlasting as the original covenant. No one was ever saved by the law before or after the cross. This is clearly seen in Genesis 3 when Adam and Eve tried to make their own fig leaves to cover themselves. Their fig leaves proved useless in God’s sight just as the deeds of the law. In Genesis 3:21 an animal had to die to cover Adam and Eve. This represents Jesus dying on the cross – which is the everlasting covenant. So throughout the Old Testament we see the new or renewed covenant whenever God is promising mankind His grace. Throughout the New Testament we see the renewed or everlasting covenant. Maybe we could clear up a lot of confusion by just calling the New Covenant the Everlasting Covenant, and calling the Old Covenant the “useless covenant.” Remember the New Covenant is the renewing of the original everlasting covenant based on better promises-God’s promises. 

While we have grace in the Everlasting Covenant. we also have the law in the Everlasting Covenant. This is why I really appreciate how Thursday’s lesson of last week brought out how the new covenant was not about new laws, but about a new heart. 

I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; I will take the heart of stone out of your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put My Spirit within you and cause you to walk in My statutes, and you will keep My judgments and do them. Ezekiel 36:26-27 NKJV

God does not give us new laws. He gives us new hearts that will trust His promises instead of relying on self. God changes our hearts so that we can keep and cherish all the promises God makes for us in His law. In the Ten Commandments God promises He will deliver us from bondage so we won’t need any other gods before us. He promises to fulfil all our temporal and emotional needs so we won’t need to steal or commit adultery. He promises us a weekly Sabbath rest to always remind us to never rely on our own works. 

After all the problem at Sinai was not the law, it was the promises the people were making. Again that is why Paul said the fault was with “them” in Hebrews 8:8. When God renews His Everlasting Covenant we will be keeping the law with all our new hearts.

But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, says the Lord: I will put My law in their minds, and write it on their hearts; and I will be their God, and they shall be My people. Jeremiah 31:33 NKJV 

Now in Jeremiah 31:32 God talks about Israel breaking the covenant when He led them out of Egypt. They broke God’s covenant when they went about to establish their own covenant promises. God never asked them to make their own promises. Remember in Exodus 19:4-6 God asks them to cherish His promises. The useless covenant is mankind promising God. The Everlasting and Re-Newed Everlasting Covenant is God promising man. By God’s Everlasting Promises of grace in both the Old and New Testaments we have salvation from sin, and are given new hearts that can keep or Shamar, cherish the everlasting law. We escape the corruption in the world by cherishing God’s great and everlasting promises. 

by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. 2 Peter 1:4 NKJV

You may study this week’s Sabbath School lesson here.

6: Jesus, the Faithful Priest – Teaching Plan

Posted on  by Michael Frackeravatar

Key Thought: Hebrews Chapters 5-7 provide a close explanation of Jesus’ priesthood, its characteristics and implications for God’s relationship with believers.
February 5, 2022

1. Have a volunteer read Hebrews 5:1-10.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the most important point is in this passage.
  2. What is the role of the priesthood and how does Jesus fulfill that role?
  3. Personal Application: If we are His royal priesthood, what should our relationship be with other people? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states, “Why do we need someone arguing on our behalf? Jesus died for our sins and everything ended at the cross with the ultimate sacrifice/ Nothing else was needed.” How would you respond to your relative?

2. Have a volunteer read Hebrews 7:11-16.

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. Why was there a need to change the Levitical law?
  3. Personal Application: Why couldn’t the animal sacrifices truly pay for our sins? Why could only the death of Jesus pay for them? Share your thoughts
  4. Case Study: One of your friends states, “Is there ever a place in our spiritual journey when we need to be accountable to a third party beside God for our progress or regression?” How would you respond to your friend?

3. Have a volunteer read Hebrews 7:16,22.

  1. Ask class members to share a short thought on what the main idea of this text is.
  2. On what basis did Jesus become a priest?
  3. Personal Application: What does it mean to you that Jesus argues on our behalf?? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: One of your relatives states: “If Jesus was a human being like us, how could He never sin? What do you think His life and interactions was like and how does it compare with yours?” How would you respond to your relative?

4. Have a volunteer read Hebrews 7:1-3.

  1. Ask class members to share a thought on what the most important point in this text is.
  2. Who was Melchizedek and how did he prefigure Jesus?
  3. Personal Application: Should Christians have a place for a spiritual authority to hold them accountable, as Paul held the Corinthians accountable? Share your thoughts.
  4. Case Study: Think of one person who needs to hear a message from this week’s lesson. Tell the class what you plan to do this week to share with them.

(Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessings can be retained only as it is shared.” Ministry of Healing, p. 148).

2: The Message of Hebrews-Sabbath School Teaching Plan

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Prepared by William Earnhardt, for Sabbath school class January 8, 2022.

Main Theme: The book of Hebrews focuses on Jesus being our high priest and mediator.

Read Together Hebrews 2:14-18. What is the main idea of this passage?

Study: What does this tell us about Jesus’ human nature?

See Desire of Ages, Page 48. “It would have been an almost infinite humiliation for the Son of God to take man’s nature, even when Adam stood in his innocence in Eden. But Jesus accepted humanity when the race had been weakened by four thousand years of sin. Like every child of Adam He accepted the results of the working of the great law of heredity. What these results were is shown in the history of His earthly ancestors. He came with such a heredity to share our sorrows and temptations, and to give us the example of a sinless life.”

Apply: What does Christ’s humanity mean to you as a Savior from the penalty of sin as well as a Savior from the power of sin? See Romans 6:3-6 and Romans 8:3-4

Share: Your friend says Jesus still does not know what its like to be tempted as a human, because while taking on human flesh He was still born of the Holy Spirit. What do you say to your friend? Hint: John 3:3, Ephesians 3:19-21, 2 Peter 1:4.

Read Together Hebrews 5:1-4. Define the main idea of this passage.

Study: What did the High Priest do?

Apply: How is every believer a priest?

Share: A relative asks you if Jesus is our High Priest, why do we need earthly priests or pastors? How do you answer your relative?

Read Together Hebrews 8:8-12. Define the main point of this passage.

Study: What does the new covenant promise us?

Apply: How do you know when God’s law is written on your heart? See Love is why we Have to…

Share: A protestant friend tells you we don’t have to keep the commandments anymore because they are just written on our heart now instead. How do you answer your friend?

Read Together Hebrews 1:5-14. What is the main idea of this passage?

Study: What is being said here about Christ being compared to angels?

Apply: Do you have any personal evidence of angels ministering to you for your salvation?

Share: Your friend says that Jesus was a really good man, but He was not God. What do you tell your friend?

But be doers of the word, and not hearers only...James 1:22.

Lesson12: Deuteronomy in the New Testament-Sabbath School Teaching Plan

Prepared by William Earnhardt for Sabbath, December 18, 2021.

Main Theme: Deuteronomy was relevant in the New Testament. It is also relevant to us today.

Read together Matthew 4:1-11. Where does this passage refer to Deuteronomy? Hint: Vs. 4. and Deuteronomy 8:3.

Study: In verse 3 how did Satan try to make Jesus doubt God’s Word? Hint: Matthew 3:17. How did Jesus overcome these temptations? By His own power of by Scripture? Are the same resources available to Jesus available to us? See article, Every Word of God Proves True.

Apply: What passages from Deuteronomy or any of the Scriptures for that matter have you used to defeat Satan?

Share: A passenger in your car says she does not need to wear a seatbelt because she trusts in God. Which incident in this passage will help you answer your passenger?

Read Together Deuteronomy 10:17-19 and Acts 10:34. What is the common theme in these passages?

Study: What is the essential message here, and why is it relevant to God’s church today?

Apply: How do we make sure we are not partial or biased in our dealings with others, especially our own church family?

Share: A family member claims he would come back to church if the church was more involved in social issues and social rights. How do you respond to your friend?

Read Together Galatians 3:1-14. What reference is made to Deuteronomy? Hint: Deuteronomy 21:22-23.

Study: How does Deuteronomy help us understand what type of death Jesus died for us on the cross? For further study see the article The God-forsaken God.

Apply: Is our obedience motivated by a legalistic hope of reward, or is motivated by love?

Share: Your friend says since the law does not save us we should not keep it. How do you respond to your friend?

Read Together Deuteronomy 18:15-19 along with Acts 3:22 and Acts 7:37. What is the main idea of these passage?

Study: How do Peter and Stephen apply Deuteronomy 18:18?

Apply: In what ways might we be rejecting the words and testimony of Jesus today? How can we repent of that?

Share: Can you think of someone who might need to hear something that was said in class today? Can you find a way to share it with them this week?

But be doers of the word, and not hearers only...James 1:22.